Locations listed are located in Pennsylvania (USA), unless otherwise noted in post.

30 August 2015

Sunday’s Obituary: John Eckman


John Eckman was a well known citizen of Strasburg Township, Lancaster County. He died on 8 December 1889 at his home across from the Reformed Church in New Providence. He was born in that neighborhood, lived his life there, was a painter there, married and raised a family there, and died there. 

He had been a justice of peace, an elected position, for some years. He held the office until his death. 

He had been sick from a bilious attack. He left a wife and 10 children, according to his death notice in the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. 

Note:
John Eckman is my husband’s 2x great grandfather. He is the son of Henry Eckman and Elizabeth Eckman. He married Catherine Kezia Cresswell on 7 January 1858. I have documented 11 children. Three passed before their father. 

Source:
The Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 9 December 1889. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. 

 

Sunday’s Obituary is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

29 August 2015

Man inherits girls ... in 1950

Wills often offer insight into the family. As I was researching the Freitas family in Rhode Island, I noticed an article about a man who inherited dancing girls ... in 1950!

Christopher G. Janus, of Chicago, inherited his late mother's third of his uncle's estate. His uncle, P. Z. Aristophron, died in 1944 in Egypt. Janus, under Egyptian custom, is responsible for the welfare of everything on the land, including the workers and their families. The families include 12 dancing girls for whom Janus is now responsible.

The girls range in age from 16 to 22. Janus' mother's share, and now therefore his, would include four of these girls. Janus' wife is not amused at the situation.

Source:
Newport Daily News, (Newport, Rhode Island) 5 January 1950.

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Katrina devastates New Orleans

It was On This Day in 2005 – just 10 years ago now – that New Orleans was struck by Hurricane Katrina. It was – and remains – the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States. By the time it made landfall, it had reached a Category 5 status.  

Despite a mandatory evacuation order, thousands of people remained. They either did not want to leave their homes or simply did not have the resources to leave. Those stranded behind had to deal with not only the actual natural disaster, but also the worst of humanity came out among the survivors. There was looting and murder. There were numerous rapes and other violent crimes against each other. 

More than 1,300 deaths were contributed to Katrina. There was an estimated $150 billon in damages to both public and private property. Millions were displaced and the coast line of Louisiana changed forever. 

Source
Hurricane Katrina slams into Gulf. History.com 29 August 2005.  

Photo:
Public domain photo from Wikipedia.


On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

Sorting Saturday: Random Genealogical Gems

My poor desks. I have just been piling things around and they were in need of a really good Sorting Saturday. 

I also found things … things I forgot I even had! I found a USB extension thingie. Like that technical term? It gives me five extra ports. I had forgotten all about that one. I found some seed packages, several books that I have not around to reading yet, and my renewal form for the National Genealogical Society (NGS). Fortunately the deadline is not until next week so I’m still good there! I even found the instructions on how to use my “new” Windows phone. I got it several months ago and simply ask my twin 16 year olds to “fix it” when I get annoyed! 

I found a post it note with information on my great grandmother’s naturalization information. Her name is Bessie Matys Hruszczak. The number written on a census was 3-172456 with the date 2/27/40. The 3 indicates District 3, which in 1940 was Philadelphia. Her application number then is 172456 and the verification date is 2/27/40. Now to find the actual paperwork … 

Another note reminded me that men born between 1872 and 1900 would be included in the World War I Draft Registration. 

I am the queen of post it notes but I really do need to clean more often! Another note reminds me of lesser known ports of immigration. Galveston was open in the 1830s. San Francisco was open in the 1840s. New Orleans was open in the 1820s. Philadelphia was a popular port in the 1700s and prior to that, Baltimore was a port of immigration in the 1600s.  

One of the books I have set aside to read is The History of Manheim Township. Manheim Township is a municipality in Lancaster County. I skimmed the book and one note reads that in 1941 there was a polio epidemic. It was so bad that school opened late that fall.  

There are still two more piles but those are more organized so they should be easy enough to get through. 

 

Sorting Saturday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.
 

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

28 August 2015

On This Day: Gallaghersville man injured in railroad accident


Joseph Cadwell was injured at the Kinzer station in Lancaster County, reported the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer On This Day in 1880.

The accident occurred the day prior, on 27 August. The Johnstown express train was heading east on the Pennsylvania railroad when it struck Cadwell, a track hand. Cadwell is a single man and lived in Gallaghersville, Chester County. 

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 28 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

27 August 2015

On This Day: Chicken thieves sent to jail


Two chicken thieves were sent to jail On This Day in 1880. Alderman Spurrier heard the case and sent Jacob Weaver and Charles Albright to jail, in default of bail, where they will await court. Weaver and Albright are accused of stealing chickens from John H. Coover of Ephrata, Lancaster County.

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 27 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

26 August 2015

Wedding Wednesday: Sue Eckman weds Clay Acheson

Sue Eckman and Clay Acheson were married on 19 January 1915. They were married by the Rev. D. G. Glass, pastor of the Faith Reformed Church in Lancaster. 



Source:

The Star-independent. (Harrisburg, Pa.), 20 Jan. 1915. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. 

 

Wedding Wednesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Coal train thrown off track near Shenandoah


A coal train was thrown from its track near Shenandoah, reported the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer On This Day in 1880. The incident happened Tuesday, 24 August in the morning on the Lehigh Valley railroad. One of the pony wheels of the engine had broke. A dozen or so cars were wrecked and three men were injured.

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 26 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

25 August 2015

Tuesday's Tip

When interviewing family, do NOT ask Yes/No questions. Sometimes being vague is better than specific. Remember to ask why. Why did you get married at that time of the year? Why did you name your son that? Why did you choose her as your matron of honor and not your sister? Why? Let them elaborate on family events!

 

Tuesday's Tip is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Naturalization explained

Naturalization – that is, the process of becoming a naturalized citizen – was explained On This Day in 1880 by the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer.  

If one arrived in the US after the age of 18, he had to make a declaration of intent to become a citizen. After a waiting period, he was entitled to his papers for the court. The rules were slightly different for those who were not yet 18 upon arrival. While they still had papers to file, they did not have to make a declaration of intent. 

A declaration was then required stating that the applicant supports the US Constitution and that he renounces any and all former allegiances. This means the immigrant no longer supported the country of their birth. 

The court also required witnesses. This was supposed to be someone who knew the person and could vouch for their person. Supposed to be and was are two different things here. It is known now – and it probably was then too – that people stood up for others because they were paid to, or they were of the same ethnic background, or because they were actually friends or family.  

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 25 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 
 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

24 August 2015

Family days

I feel as though I have fallen down a bit on the job, so to speak. I wanted to write a little about family members who were celebrating birthdays, anniversaries, anniversary of deaths, and other important days. However, I just never seem to get that done. So today, I am playing catch up and trying to work ahead!

Saturday was my 23rd anniversary. We were married in 1992 at Our Lady of Consolation RC Church in Parkesburg (Chester County) by Father George Schneider. It was also my husband's cousin's 28th birthday. I remember feeling so bad that Devin had to share his 5th birthday with us. I am sure that was not what any five year old wanted to do on a beautiful August afternoon but he is a great kid and really seemed to enjoy being with everyone.

Sunday - yesterday - was my cousin Sharon's 35th anniversary. It was also the 10th anniversary of the death of Sharon's father (my Uncle Reds)'s second wife, Margaret Glebe Welsh. I have to admit I do not recall Sharon's mom. I only remember him and Margaret. To me, she was a very lovely lady. May Her Memory Be Eternal.

Today ... today 25 years ago my grandmother's brother, Peter Kurenda, passed away. Uncle Pete was the son of John Kurenda and Frances Skrabalak. He married Anna Letnianchepi and they had seven children. Today is also the 109th anniversary of the death of Katherine O'Flaherty. Katherine is the daughter of Hugh O'Flaherty and Katherine Dee. She was just a month old when she died. May their Memory Be Eternal.


On This Day: Soldiers head to Philadelphia after riot

Soldiers head to Philadelphia On This Day in 1864 after a day of riots in Baltimore. A riot broke out yesterday at the Provost Marshal’s office involving some 200 men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Regiment. Many of the men were at Soldiers’ Rest and were drunk. The PM’s guard arrested many. Others got upset and a riot broke out. Approximately a dozen men on each side were injured.  

Source

The Evening Telegraph. (Philadelphia, PA), 24 August 1864. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  



On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

23 August 2015

On This Day: Herr raises barn


Daniel Herr raised a new barn, reported the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer On This Day in 1880. Herr, a former Lancaster County treasurer, lost his Pequea barn some time ago to a fire. Former sheriff H. N. Breneman and Mr. John Ingram supervised approximately 100 men in the raising. 

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 23 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.
 

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015