18 December 2014

A closer look at Hiram Cory

Hiram Cory lived in Concord Township in 1859. He owned a tract of land where the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad would, two years later, intersect with the Sunbury and Erie Railroad.

Amos Harrington sold 63 acres to Hiram in 1858, according to the Corry Area Chamber of Commerce. Hiram built his home on West Washington Street. Hiram and Harrington however were not the first settlers. That distinction goes to Michael and Elizabeth Hare. The Hares built a cabin on the banks of a creek in 1795. That creek is now called Hare Creek.

Hiram was assessed at 144, according to the Financial Assessment of Erie County and General Business Directory 1859-1860. There was one other Cory included in the assessment. He was Henry and he was assessed at 25.

On 27 May 1861, the railroads came to cross. Cory sold a portion of his land to the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad for this venture to work. The Railroad in turn built a ticket office and named it after him, though they spelled it incorrectly. The name Corry stuck and that is how the town got its name.

In 1863 the town became a borough. In 1866 it officially became a city. But what of Hiram? None of the histories available online mention him after he sells some of his land and the town receives its name. In fact, all the histories read almost verbatim! So what happened to Hiram? Has the town forgotten its founder?

A quick Google search led to Ancestry.com where Hiram Cory is found listed as the son of James (1794-1846) and Rebecca Sperry (1800-1976) Cory. Hiram was born in 1834 making him just 24 years old when he became the town’s namesake. He married Mary Ann Rine (1834-1906) and fathered six children with her. Their children are: Carey, Orissa, Marie (1869-1892), Elizabeth, Oscar (1866-1957), and Russel Rine (b. 1872). He and Mary Ann are buried in the Old Baptist Cemetery in Frankfort, Ross County, Ohio.

However that whole line, according to Find A Grave, which quotes a text called The Cory Family, shows the family all in Ohio. Births, deaths, burials – everything happened in Fayette or Ross Counties, Ohio. According to Find A Grave, Hiram and Mary Ann married on 2 November 1859 in Ross County, Ohio.

Find A Grave does list one other Hiram Cory. That Hiram (1820-1887) was the son of James and Poly Rice Cory. He married Fanny Spencer (1820-1887), They show up on the 1860 Census in Pinckney, Lewis County, NY with three children: Sedate, Sandusky, and Ashley. Hiram and Fanny are buried at the Huron Evergreen Cemetery in Huron, Wayne County, NY.

This last entry would put Hiram at 38 years of age when he bought that land from Harrington. This, in my opinion, seems more plausible than a 24 year old affording 63 acres.

Hiram remains a mystery. On that note, I am sending off an email to the Erie County Historical Society to see if they have information on what became of Corry’s namesake.
                                                   

Sources:
Ancestry.com. Hiram S Cory. http://records.ancestry.com/hiram_s_cory_records.ashx?pid=111273795.

Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

"Corry History” Corry Area Chamber of Commerce. http://www.corrychamber.com/the-chamber/history/. Last accessed online 18 December 2014.


Those Places Thursday: Corry PA

Corry is a small town in northwestern Pennsylvania that roughly 6,400 people call home. It is located about 30 miles southeast of Erie. 

The town was named for Hiram Cory. The Atlantic and Great Western Railroad intersected with the Sunbury and Erie Railroad on 27 May 1861. The land where those two railroads intersected was owned by Cory. He has sold a portion of his land to the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad and the railroad then built a ticket office there naming it for him. However a spelling error caused the town to be named Corry instead. 

The railroad saw the growth of many small towns and cities across America, and Corry was no different. 

The town became a borough in 1863 and later, in 1866, was deemed a city. Industry drove the growth of the city, which became famous for the manufacturing of Climax locomotives In fact, manufacturing still accounts for approximately 30% of the industries in Corry.
The postcard pictured here is dated 26 July 1911. It is addressed to a Mr. Harry Kurtz of Narvon, Lancaster County. Honey Brook was originally written and was crossed out. Honey Brook is across the county line from Narvon and is located in Chester County.


Those Places Thursday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.

17 December 2014

Wordless Wednesday: Panko Hruszczak

 
Certificate of Citizenship
for Panko Hruszczak
my great grandfather
 
Wordless Wednesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.
 

Grant ordered Jews out of his military district

It was this day in 1862 that Major-General Ulysses S. Grant issued his controversial General Order No. 11. It was this order that called for the expulsion of Jews in Tennessee, Mississippi and Kentucky. That is, he ordered the Jewish people to vacate his military district.  

“The Jews, as a class violating every regulation of trade established by the Treasury Department and also department orders, are hereby expelled from the department within twenty-four hours from the receipt of this order,” read the Order. 

Word of the Order traveled slow. Cesar Kaskel, a Jewish gentleman from Paducah, KY, made haste to Washington and pleaded personally to President Abraham Lincoln. When Lincoln learned of this Order, he immediately ordered it repealed.

 

On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.
Some posts will be brief while others may be more detailed.

 
 

16 December 2014

Severe earthquakes strike New Madrid

Early this morning, back in 1811, in northeast Arkansas, the first of a series of severe earthquakes occurred. Five hours later, a second quake occurred. Both measured greater than 7.0. The quakes were part of the New Madrid Fault Line.

 
On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.
Some posts will be brief while others may be more detailed.

Tombstone Tuesday: Charles L Miller

 
Father
Charles L. Miller
Born Oct. 27, 1884
Died Dec. 8, 1911
 
A little flower of love
That blossom about to die
Transplanted now above
At home (?) with God above.
 
Buried at Clearfield United Methodist Cemetery in New Providence, Lancaster County.
 
 
Tombstone Tuesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.


 
 

15 December 2014

On This Day the Battle of Nashville changes the direction of the war

Union forces under Maj. Gen. George Thomas, a native Virginian, almost completely destroyed the Army of Tennessee today in 1864 during the Battle of Nashville. The Army of Tennessee was led by Lt. Gen. John Hood. 

Hood had secured a position south of the city. It was his hope to draw the Union forces into an attack. Thomas held off attacking claiming it was freezing and Calvary support was limited. When he did finally attack on 15 December 1864, his men took to the west in close combat. Hood was forced to retreat two miles south by the end of the day. 

The battle continued the next day. Hood ordered a retreat further south and the Union claimed victory. It was the last major battle in the western theater. 

For more information on this battle, visit the Battle of Nashville Preservation Society online.

 


On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.

So who was Ramsey?

My first post this morning fell under Amanuensis Monday and was a letter written to my 3x great grandfather Chrispin Pierson Van Horn from Ramsey. As I stated in that post, some letters identify him as a friend and others state he was a cousin. Some include his last name as Dudbridge. Chrispin’s mother was Jane Dudbridge (born 1811). 

The 1900 Census reveals a 16 year old Ramsey Dudbridge living in Warminster Township, Bucks County. The head of house is his older brother Harry. Harry was born in October 1875. Other household members are their mother (Elizabeth), their aunt Nancy Carr, brother Charles, and brother C. Carr. Their mother was born in September 1842. Aunt Nancy was born in September 1850. Charles was born in November 1878. C. Carr was born in June 1880. Ramsey was born in September 1883. The Census shows both mother and aunt were widows. Their mother had been married for five years and had four children, all of whom were still living. These four would obviously be Harry, Charles, C. Carr, and Ramsey. Nancy states she was married for zero years, indicating her husband passed within their first year of marriage. She had no children.  

Unfortunately the 1890 Census is not available, but I found 37 year old Elizabeth on the 1880 Census. Her husband is 38 year old Phineas Dudbridge, a farmer. They have three sons at home: William, age 7; Henry, age 4; and Charles, age 2. Living with them is 11 year old niece Alice Van Horn; 77 year old mother in law Mary Brady; 39 year old sister in law Nancy Carr; and 60 year old farm hand Henry Jamison. Phineas is a farmer. They reside in Warminster Township, Bucks County. Mary Alice Van Horn (born 12 July 1868) is the daughter of Chrispin Pierson and Maria Rice Van Horn! 

In 1900 Elizabeth told the Census worker she had been married for five years and that she had four sons. It is possible she misunderstood and meant she had only four living sons at that time. Ramsey was not born until 1884 and was the youngest of the Dudbridge boys. The five years of marriage does not fit with any calculation. 

Phineas Jenks Dudbridge, according to Find A Grave, was born in 1821 and died in 1894. Elizabeth lived until 1923. They are buried in Neshaminy Cemetery, Hartsville, Bucks County with their some Willie Bready (1873-1881). Phineas’ memorial states he was a farmer in Warwick, Bucks County and was the father of William, Henry and Charles. There is no mention of C. Carr or Ramsey in this entry. 

Tracing Ramsey forward from 1900:

The 1910 Census lists Ramsey having just recently married Annetta. She is one year his senior. They were married one year and their daughter Elsie R. is one month old. The Census was taken in April. Ramsey is a carpenter. They live in Ivyland, Bucks County. 

In 1918, like most men, Ramsey filled out a draft registration card for World War I. He gives his full name as Ramsey Bready Dudbridge, living in Ivyland, Bucks County. He was 34 and states his birth date is 13 September 1884. He is a carpenter employed by W. John Stevens Inc. His nearest relative is naturally Annetta. He is of medium height and build.   

Ramsey is still a carpenter in 1920. He, Annetta and their daughter Elsie live on Lincoln Avenue in Ivyland. Annetta is a dry goods merchant and Elsie is in public school. 

By 1930 the family has moved to Moreland Avenue in Hatboro, Montgomery County. The couple had been married 20 years ago. Elsie is 20 and, being single, still living with her parents. She is a secretary in the lumber industry. Ramsey is still a carpenter. Annetta is not working. 

In 1942 Ramsey fills out a draft registration card for the Second World War. He lists his address as 33 W. Moreland Avenue in Hatboro, Montgomery County. He wrote his birth year as 1883 (in 1918 he stated he was born in 1884) and that he was born in Hartsville, Bucks County. He lists his nearest relative as Elsie R. Goens, of the same address. One can assume that between 1930 and 1942, Elsie got married to someone with the last name Goens. Ramsey writes “same” for employer and address of employer. This could mean he worked out of his house or that he did not work, even though he was only 59 at the time. He describes himself as 5’10” tall and 180 pounds with blue eyes and gray hair with a light complexion. 

Ramsey lived for 92 years! He died in February 1975. He is buried at Neshaminy Cemetery in Hartsville, Bucks County. 

Find A Grave shows Ramsey (1994-1975) buried at Neshaminy Cemetery with his wife and daughter. No images of their stones are provided as proof. Annetta is listed as having been born in 1881 and passing the year after Ramsey, in 1976. Elsie is included as Elsie R. Dudbridge. She was born in 1910 and died 1996, according to Find A Grave. 

Annetta, according to the Social Security Death Index (SSDI), died in November 1976. The SSDI shows that Elsie was born on 28 February 1910 and died 21 July 1996. Her last residence was Willow Grove, Montgomery County. She is listed as still a Dudbridge. 

Sources:
Ancestry.com. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. 

Ancestry.com. U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.  

National Archives at St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; World War II draft cards (Fourth Registration) for the State of Pennsylvania; State Headquarters: Pennsylvania; Microfilm Series: M1951; Microfilm Roll: 79 

Number: 162-05-2112; Issue State: Pennsylvania; Issue Date: Before 1951 

Number: 163-01-9021; Issue State: Pennsylvania; Issue Date: Before 1951 

Number: 163-50-1829; Issue State: Pennsylvania; Issue Date: 1973 

Year: 1900; Census Place: Warminster, Bucks, Pennsylvania; Roll: 1386; Page: 8B; Enumeration District: 0042; FHL microfilm: 1241386 

Year: 1910; Census Place: Ivyland, Bucks, Pennsylvania; Roll: T624_1320; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 0056; FHL microfilm: 1375333 

Year: 1920; Census Place: Ivyland, Bucks, Pennsylvania; Roll: T625_1542; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 30; Image: 854 

Year: 1930; Census Place: Hatboro, Montgomery, Pennsylvania; Roll: 2081; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 0043; Image: 987.0; FHL microfilm: 2341815 

 

Mystery Monday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.

A letter from a cousin

My 3x great grandfather Chrispin Pierson Van Horn corresponded often with someone named Ramsey. Some letters identify Ramsey as a friend and some as a cousin. Some include his last name as Dudbridge, to whom Chrispin would be related. 

In 1900 Ramsey lived in Hartsville, Bucks County, according to postmarks on various letters. Chrispin lived in Mortonville, Chester County at that time. 

Below is one letter dated 12 April 1900:

Dear Friend, 

News of the (?) was received and was glad to hear that you stood your trip allright and that you are in good health, hoping you will still continue the same. 

Auntie refunds the money to you because you need the money worst than she does and as for the (?) mess, that is free gratis. It is no more than right. 

We do miss you so much. The table looks queer without you and the violin. It seems as if we had moved into another house. 

The boys have been very busy the last week. They have got two and a half acres of spring rye in and if it hadn’t rained today they would of put their oats in and then the potatoes. I wish they were planted. 

I have been making garden this last week. We have our onions some lettuce and radishes and 4 rows of peas planted so I guess this rain is going to start the seeds to grow. That is if it does not rain too hard. 

Mother has not come home yet. I got a letter from her yesterday and she said she was well and having a nice time. She was sorry to know you had gone before she came back. And if she knew you was at the Broad Street Depot she would of come ober to see you off.  

Now I must close as it is feeding chickens time and Carr is hollowing for me. We are all well. Charlies boil is getting better. Good Bye. 

I remain
Your True Friend
Ramsey 

A second post today will further explore who Ramsey was and how exactly he was related.
 
Note: The letter had been written in pencil and the handwriting light enough that I could not get a good image. The envelope above is the one used with this letter. It was postmarked Breadyville. The stamp is a two cent Washington stamp, carmine. It was part of the Ordinary Issue of 1894.

 

Amanuensis Monday is a genealogy prompt of GeneaBloggers in which the writings - letters, diaries, etc., - of those passed are featured.  

14 December 2014

Princess Mary Stuart became Queen of Scotland today

Princess Mary Stuart became Mary, Queen of Scotland today in 1542. She was the daughter of King James V of Scotland, who died when she was just six days old, and his second wife, Mary of Guise. Being only an infant, a regent - James Hamilton, the Earl of Arran – was chosen in her stead.

 


On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.

Sunday’s Obituary: Willie L. Loose


A pile of random papers from an unidentified newspaper offered the obituary of a child, a mere 19 year old child, and a poem in his memory. The obituary is that of “our lamented and sainted Bro. Willie Loose, son of Rev. E. Loose.” The poem is by Rev. C. G. Koch.

LOOSE, Willie L., son of Rev. E. and S. Loose, lost his life in the River Raisin, by accident, March 5, 1883, in his nineteenth birthday. His body has not yet been found. He was converted in his eighth year, united with our Church, and remained faithful til death. He was contemplating the ministry when he so suddenly lost his life. He was a most excellent young man. On the evening of March 4th, he conducted our young people’s meeting for the last time. After services he said to me: “I can trust God as never before.” Funeral services May 17th, by the writer, from Isa. 57:1-2, assisted by S. Coply, H. Spitler, A. J. Gramly and C. G. Koch. He leaves parents, 5 brothers and 2 sisters to mourn.  … S. Heininger

So what happened that fateful day and where is River Raisin?

A quick Google search shows that the River Raisin is a river in Michigan, specifically southeastern Michigan. It traverses through the counties of Lenawee, Monroe, Washtenaw, Jackson, and Hillsdale, Michigan as well as a portion of Fulton County, Ohio. Since his obituary states he lost his life in the river, it is most likely safe to assume he drowned.

The Loose family was actually from Pennsylvania! Both parents – Elias and Sophia – were born in Pennsylvania. Willie had an older brother Joseph, who was born in 1859 in Ohio. Willie was born in 1864 in Michigan. The 1880 Census shows Elias is a farmer in Rasinville, Monroe County, Michigan. Both boys farmed as well. The family had a 26 year old servant, John Windland, living with them. Windland was from Bavaria.

Willie is buried in Doty Cemetery, in Monroe County with his family. His tombstone (see Find A Grave below in the sources) lists both his birth and death days as 5 March.

Sources:
William L Loose. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=44328666&ref=acom. Last accessed online 9 December 2014.

Year: 1880; Census Place: Raisinville, Monroe, Michigan; Roll: 596; Family History Film: 1254596; Page: 565B; Enumeration District: 186; Image: 0319

 
Sunday’s Obituary is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.

13 December 2014

Concentration camp workers executed

Elisabeth Volkenrath, Irma Grese, and Joseph Kramer were executed today in 1945. All three had worked at Nazi concentration camps. All were tried at the Belsen Trial.

Volkenrath was a supervisor at several Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War. The British Army arrested her in April 1945. She stood trial at the Belsen Trial and was sentenced to death. On 13 December 1945, she was executed by Albert Pierrepoint at the Hamelin Prison. She was 26 at that time.

Grese, like Volkenrath, worked in Nazi concentration camps. She too stood trial at the Belsen Trial and was also sentenced to death. She was 23 when she was executed in 1945.

Kramer had been at several concentration camps. Pierrepoint hung Kramer in 1945.

 

On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.

Sibling Saturday: Mom and Uncle Tom

 
Barbara Lorraine Still Ruczhak (my mom) and her brother, my Uncle Tom Still
 
 
 
Sibling Saturday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.